Christmas Announcement

Our clinics will be closed from 25/12 to 7/1 included. Happy Holidays!

If you’ve done any research into dental implants, you’ll know that despite being around for over fifty years, implant-based restorations remain the most life-like form of tooth replacement that modern dentistry allows. You might also know they’re the gold standard for missing tooth replacement and can last for many years. That’s all well and good, but what do dental implants look like? How do they look and feel when in the mouth? And what do they look like during and after surgery?

In this post, we’ll answer all of these questions, but let’s get straight to the point, what do dental implants really look like?

To look at, at least, dental implants are pretty unassuming. When you first see one, you’ll notice that it resembles a small, lightweight metal cylinder or post. In fact, if you hold a tooth implant, it feels as lightweight as a piece of plastic. However, it’s much more than that. Dental implants are highly engineered pieces of equipment designed to become part of your mouth.  

Let’s explain…

Dental implants are typically made from titanium and designed to be anchored into the jaw after dental implant surgery. Each implant is engineered with precise channels, grooves and rough or smooth surfaces to ensure the best chance of bone fusion.

Why is this important?

It’s essential to remember that dental implants are a standalone replacement. In other words, unlike conventional bridges or partial dentures, they don’t rely on other teeth for support. For that to happen, an implant needs to fuse with the bone tissue in a process known as osseointegration. Titanium is one of the few materials to physically fuse with the bone. 

Over 3-4 months, the implant goes from being recently placed and relatively fragile to something rock solid in the jaw. Once it becomes part of the mouth, it acts as a base for a dental crown or implant-supported bridge.  

So what do dental implants look like once the restoration is attached?

Incredibly life-like. In fact, with the advancements in CEREC technology, dental crowns are milled and colour-matched to perfection. So once the restoration is in place, you (or anyone else) won’t even notice the difference.  

You could say that dental implants come in three distinctive parts. They are

  • The titanium implant itself – is placed during a short dental implant surgery
  • The abutment – a connecting joint that keeps the restoration on the implant
  • And finally, the restoration itself.  

Collectively, they make up a tooth implant which is important to know as we go on to explain other aspects. 

As a top tip, if you are considering undergoing dental implant surgery and want to find out more, you can always visit a dentist that offers a free consultation. In addition to finding out whether you’re a good candidate, an experienced dentist will also answer questions like how long the process will take, what you can expect and even what do dental implants look like. 

Because it’s a free dental consultation near you, there is nothing to lose by booking an appointment. This way, at least you can find the correct information to make a fully informed decision.

what do tooth implants look like sydneySo, now you know what tooth implants look like before and after dental implant surgery, let’s explore how they feel once in the mouth.

Although dental implants do many things that natural teeth do, you won’t have any feeling from the implant itself.

Any feelings such as sensitivity or tenderness will typically stem from the surrounding gum. So an implant won’t feel like a natural tooth per se, but it will certainly look like one. 

Aside from that, dental implants look and feel just like your natural tooth. Of course, you’ll notice that you no longer have a tooth gap, but that’s a good thing as it gives you the ability to restore full biting and chewing capability.  

At DDSS/DDII, our experienced team can blend restorations perfectly into your existing smile. So once the dental implant has been in position for a few weeks, you won’t even know it’s there.

We’ve answered the question of what do dental implants look like compared to natural teeth, and we’ve also discussed what they look and feel like when in the mouth. What we haven’t discussed is how they look during and just after surgery. So let’s do that now.

What dental implants look like during and (just) after surgery

In most cases, the implant must fuse with the bone before a permanent dental crown or bridge is fitted. So, during the surgical process, the implant is inserted into the bone using conventional implant surgery or via the latest computer-guided placement. Either way, it remains covered by the gum, so you won’t see it. 

In some cases, the abutment may be attached at the same time and is visible above the gum line but only when the mouth is open. 

Sometimes, a temporary crown is secured if the tooth gap is directly in the smile line. Temporary crowns are designed to be just that – so they may be a little more noticeable than your permanent restoration and feel a little bulkier too. So for a few weeks, your newly placed implant and crown may look slightly different from your natural teeth, but once this is replaced with the permanent crown, you won’t notice a difference.

So there you have it. Hopefully, we’ve answered the question of what do dental implants look like at all stages of the dental implant process, but if you have any other burning questions that need answering, get a free consultation at your local dental clinic. Here at DDSS/DDII, our Sydney implant dentists take the time to answer all your questions or concerns so you can make an informed decision.  

What have you got to lose? Get in touch and let us help you decide.  

Note: Any surgical or invasive procedure carries risks. Before proceeding, you should seek a second opinion from an appropriately qualified health practitioner.

References:

Colgate.com – what is Cerec in Dentistry?

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/dental-visits/what-is-cerec-in-dentistry 

Healthline: – Is It Common To Experience Pain After Getting Dental Implants?

https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/dental-implant-pain 

NCBI – Clinical Advantages of Computer-Guided Placement – A systematic Review

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23062137

Dental Implant Cost in Thailand – Is The Cost Saving Worth It?
dental implant cost thailand

There’s no getting away from the fact that when it comes to dental implant cost, Thailand can offer considerable savings versus the same treatment back Read more

Dental Implants In Bali – Dental Tourism And The Facts
dental-implants-sydney-cbd

If you’re considering dental implants in Bali, then you’re not alone. Over 10,000 Australians make the trip abroad to get dental work done each year, Read more

Considering Dental Implants Overseas – What Could Go Wrong?
dental-implant-overseas-sydney

Have you ever been intrigued by the idea of getting cheap dental implants overseas? If the answer is yes, then you’re not alone. The Australian dental Read more

dental Promo

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest